Category: Northern News

SB 50/SB 4 compromise summary

California’s SB50, the MoreHomes Act, changed a bit after merging with SB4 in the Governance & Finance Committee. The flowchart explains how different places may or may not be affected. (Created and tweeted by Alfred Twu, Berkeley artist and activist, who thanked Liam Dillon for excellent reporting and Annie Fryman for details.)

By Liam Dillon, Los Angeles Times. April 24, 2019.

SB 50 will be amended to do all of the below. SB 4 will be held in committee.

Statewide provisions:

  • Sensitive communities agreement with housing advocates:
    • Include at a minimum those areas: designated high segregation and poverty and low-resource in TCAC opportunity maps; top 25% Cal EnviroScreen scores; 2019 HUD qualified census tracts; potentially others
    • COGs run process to identify sensitive communities with minimum requirements for outreach to disadvantaged populations
    • Opt in before July 1, 2025 to planning process based on petition with 20% population in census tract signing and specified outreach requirements
  • Changes to ensure offsite affordable housing is actually built: no certificate of occupancy on market rate without building permit, and has to be near transit and within half mile of original project site.
  • Technical amendments to clarify how density bonus works.
  • Commitment to include inclusionary percentages that are worked out with housing advocates and agreeable to SGF committee.
  • Creation of fourplexes by right (regardless of jurisdiction population) in residential areas on vacant land and allows conversions of existing structure—but no demolition, as follows:
    • 75% of exterior walls must be intact and no more than +15% increase square footage. Also has to abide by all other local regulations (setbacks, lot coverage, FAR, height, etc).
    • Must include SB 35 limitations on eligible parcels.
  • Exempt very high fire hazard severity zones.
  • Exempt coastal zone in cities with populations less than 50,000.
  • Restrict bill to infill parcels in coastal zone regardless of jurisdiction size.

In counties over 600,000 population:

  • SB 50 zoning provisions regarding rail, ferry, job rich, and bus stop (as modified below):
    • Exempt contributing parcels in legislatively-adopted historic districts in existence as of 2010, and density bonus language going forward
    • Bus stops: Shorten headways to 10 minutes during peak times to qualify. Clarify that it’s each line going in each direction. Must have met the headway standard for the past 5 years.
  • SB 50 parking (no parking around rail, 0.5 spaces per unit minimum elsewhere)

In counties 600,000 population or less, modify equitable communities incentive to:

  • Grant waiver from density (with minimum of 30 units/acre in urban jurisdictions and 20/units acre in suburban jurisdictions, as defined in existing law), height limits of zoning on the parcel plus one story, and floor area ratio of 0.6 times the # of stories for projects within half-mile around rail/ferry in cities over 50,000
  • Continue to work with Senate EQ on identifying a definition of “infill” that doesn’t induce sprawl.
  • Exempt floodplains per SB4
  • SB 4 parking applies: no parking minimum within ¼ mile of rail in cities over 100,000, 0.5 spaces per unit minimum elsewhere

Street Air on Earth Day

By Zelda Zivny, Milo Wetherall, and Charlie Millenbah, April 22, 2019

In 2018, we were the proud recipients of APA’s 2018 National Planning Achievement Award for a Grassroots Initiative — Gold for our Street Air Project, and its associated award-winning film Columbus Discovers Air Pollution.

Our research found that if cities chose to make simple design changes to pedestrian areas (or as we say, to the street-edge), the area’s outdoor eating experience could be notably safer as well as more enjoyable.

Having garnered significant results from our research as well as success from our Street Air group, we intend to continue working with the city [of San Francisco] throughout the Columbus Avenue redesign and plan to help other cities who reach out to us, seeking design suggestions for their new projects.

Our recently completed film, Airgregates, the Impact of Concrete Mixing Facilities on the Bay View Community,” has been selected as a finalist in the upcoming Clear the Air Film Fest sponsored by Breathe CA and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

Street Air is expanding by bringing on more students with ideas for projects they’d like to pursue. PM 1 monitors have been recently donated by local North Beach families and we have started some of the first street-edge PM 1 measurements in California.

Read the full blog post on planning.org here.

In memoriam

In memoriam

Northern News PDF, 27, kept Northern California’s urban planners informed

Northern News is saddened to announce the passing of its PDF on April 14 in San Francisco.

At an unobtrusive table not far from the entry to Moscone Center West, a small group of city planners said goodbye on April 14 to the last Northern News PDF, handing out bespoke printed copies of the April 2019 edition. Among them was Naphtali H. Knox, FAICP, 85, who as Northern News’ editor since 2005, has overseen the growth and development of the publication from a brown and white, eight-page, printed and mailed newsletter to its current all-digital format.

The child of Northern Section AIP News and Northern Section AIP Newsletter, Northern News was born in San Francisco in November 1978.

By all accounts, Northern News was happy in its cut-and-paste pre-PDF childhood in the Bay Area. As a teen, it grew into a PDF, which in the 1990s was a new way for individuals to share text and inline images with each other — and with printers who could mail printed versions of documents to subscribers — in this case, to Northern California planners.

But with printing and mailing costs escalating in the early 2000s, the APA California Northern Section board voted in July 2007 to cease mail delivery of the Northern News PDF and instead distribute the PDF via the Internet. That same year, the PDF was reformatted so that each article would be set in a single, continuous, right-hand column of text that could be read easily on a computer screen — thin page breaks were the only interruptions.

In April 2011, a full-color magazine cover was added to the PDF that, by then, had become a news magazine averaging 24 pages per issue.

Northern News selfie taken in 2012 at age 20

The single-column, continuous-page PDF was produced through April 2013, but its format changed after a chance meeting on an airplane when editor Knox sat in first class and next to the owner and CEO of a multinational media corporation. Observing Mr. Knox reviewing and editing Northern News on an iPad, he introduced himself and asked to look at the publication. The executive then pointed out that readers tend to skim PDF documents, and that readership drops off quickly with each succeeding page. Assuming that growing and maintaining readership was important, the CEO said, it was critical to begin major articles on an early page but then continue each article to the back after just one page — rather than continuing an article onto consecutive pages until it is complete. Thus each new page in, say, the first 10, would begin a new article.

The very next PDF of Northern News, May 2013, adopted that format, which continued until the death of the PDF six years later.

Northern News PDF saw some heady days. It averaged 30.4 pages during the three years 2014–2016, and the longest Northern News PDF ever (27,800 words on 38 pages, with 40 images) was the two-month edition issued for December 2015-January 2016.

Vital until the very end, Northern News PDF left behind a 37-page April 2019 issue with six major articles, 15,500 words, and 54 images.

The Northern Section board and the editors expect to continue Northern News without interruption and without PDF, in the format in which you are reading this memoriam.

Services have been held. Donations in memory of Northern News PDF may be made to the California Planning Foundation.

“Storytelling” at People of Color mixer in March

“Storytelling” at People of Color mixer in March

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By Cherise Orange, April 2, 2019

Diversity Directors Cindy Ma, AICP, and Cherise Orange kicked off 2019 with STORYTELLING — an art and a creative way to connect people through words and to take their imaginations across distant lands. Stories can be funny, meaningful, emotional, or a mixture of all. Storytelling can help planners generate interest, understand the communities they serve, and empower residents.

The first Diversity event of the year, a Planners of Color (POC) mixer, was held Wednesday, March 27, at Lost & Found on Telegraph Avenue in Oakland. More than 25 Bay Area planners attended to exchange ideas, network, and enjoy.

To learn about what the Diversity Committee has in store for 2019 and to sign up for event blasts, please email diversity@norcalapa.org.

SF Urban Film Festival news

SF Urban Film Festival news

By Fay Darmawi, April 12, 2019

SFUFF — the SF Urban Film Fest — had so much success in February 2019 that they have decided to hold their sixth season at the same time next year.

The festival will be coming to a theater near you from February 2 through 9, 2020.

In addition, the festival has extended its submissions deadline to April 30, 2019.

If you have a film about urban issues, you can submit it here.

Bay Area Homelessness Report

Bay Area Homelessness Report

Bay Area Council Economic Institute, April 2019, 42 pp.

“At the end of each year, the Bay Area Council surveys its members to determine which public policy areas are of the greatest concern to the region’s largest employers. In the Council’s 2017 survey, ending chronic homelessness emerged as a top public policy priority for the first time.

“This study, undertaken in cooperation with global consulting firm McKinsey & Company, aims to provide policymakers with new data and perspectives on how to solve what has become the defining moral challenge facing both the Bay Area region and California.

“Until very recently, homelessness was considered the problem of individual cities and counties. For a metropolitan region like the Bay Area, which is divided into nine counties and 101 cities, this approach fails to meet the needs of an intra-regionally mobile homeless population.

“In this report, a regional lens provides a new perspective on the homelessness crisis and offers new ways to address the problem.

“California’s relatively recent industrial development and rapid and sustained population growth over the 20th century have deprived it of inheriting large stocks of abandoned workforce housing that older cities in the Midwest and East Coast have transformed into shelters and extremely low-income housing. Cities on the West Coast, including in the Bay Area, have no such redundant housing at their disposal.”

Read the full report here.

Northern News May 2019
NPC19 Local Host Committee leadership. L-r, Sharon Grewal, AICP; Alessandra Lundin; Hing Wong, AICP; Jonathan Schuppert, AICP; James Castañeda, AICP; Bob Zimmerer, AICP.

Northern News May 2019

Northern News

APA-CA-logo-no-tagline

A publication of the American Planning Association, California Chapter, Northern Section

Making great communities happen

May 2019

FEATURED

Nonprofits may get dibs on SF apartment buildings • Meet a local planner • WHERE IN THE WORLD • NORCAL APA NEWS • Sustainable Chinatown wins (Environmental Planning) Gold at NPC19 • Director’s note • New! Northern Section webinar series • 2019 Northern Section Awards Gala June 7 • Pro bono planning assistance for California communities • My short course on Working with Difficult People • SF Urban Film Festival news • Storytelling at People of Color mixer • Street Air on Earth Day • PHOTOS FROM NPC19 • PLANNING NEWS ROUNDUP

Nonprofits may soon get first dibs on SF apartment buildings

By Jared Brey, Next City, April 9, 2019. The Community Opportunity to Purchase Act (COPA) was passed unanimously by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors April 16th. If the ordinance passes a second vote on April 23rd and is signed by the mayor, nonprofits will have a right of first refusal to buy and preserve existing affordable housing — apartment buildings with more than three units. Landlords who want to sell their buildings would first need to notify qualified nonprofit groups of their intent to sell.

Meet a local planner — Kristi Bascom

An interview by Catarina Kidd, AICP, associate editor. Kristi Bascom’s undergraduate classes in environmental studies were her first exposure to land use planning. After earning a master’s degree in city planning, she worked for several Bay Area cities. She is now Project Manager at Habitat for Humanity, East Bay/Silicon Valley, a position she took just this January.

Where in the world?

Tap for the answer

Norcal APA news

Sustainable Chinatown wins the (Environmental Planning) Gold at NPC19

From APA, April 15, 2019. Sustainable Chinatown began in 2014 as a collaboration between the Chinatown Community Development Center, SF Planning Department, SF Department of the Environment, and Enterprise Community Partners to create more affordable housing, improve access to public space, and provide services to residents and businesses.

Director’s note — May 2019

By James A. Castañeda, AICP. I write this after four stimulating days in the halls of Moscone West, still processing from the hugely successful National Planning Conference held here. The vast undertaking is behind us, but I hope our section can continue the themes, energy, and momentum locally.

New! Northern Section webinar series

Throughout 2019, we will hold a series of quarterly webinars on Northern California’s best practices in planning, and offering CM credits. COMPLETE OUR FORM BY APRIL 30 to let us know what YOU would like to present in the webinars.

2019 Northern Section Awards Gala June 7

By Carmela Campbell, Awards Program Co-director. Meet and mingle with fellow planners on Friday evening, June 7, as we present our Northern Section awards at Starline Social Club, a restaurant / bar at 2236 Martin Luther King Junior Way, Oakland.

Pro bono planning assistance for California communities

By Robert Paternoster, FAICP. Do you know of a municipality or group that needs planning assistance but doesn’t have the resources? Or a new or struggling planning function that could benefit from peer review and support? APA California can help with Community Planning Assistance, free to communities in need.

My short course on Working with Difficult People

By Steve Matarazzo. This is about arrogance in the public sector workplace, what might be behind it, and how it tends to play out. If you are reading this, I am probably not writing about you. I expect, however, that you will relate to this article.

SF Urban Film Festival news

By Fay Darmawi. SFUFF will hold its sixth season from February 2 through 9, 2020. The festival has extended its submissions deadline to APRIL 30, 2019.

“Storytelling” at People of Color mixer in March

Diversity Directors Cindy Ma, AICP, and Cherise Orange kicked off 2019’s first mixer with STORYTELLING — an art and a creative way to connect people through words and to take their imaginations across distant lands.

In memoriam

Northern News is saddened to announce the passing of its PDF on April 14 in San Francisco. Vital until the very end, Northern News PDF left behind a 37-page April 2019 issue with six major articles, 15,500 words, and 54 images.

Highlights from NPC19 in San Francisco

Planning news roundup

Parking spaces could be better used

“WePark shows that in cities like San Francisco, coworking is unaffordable to many, and the sheer volume of free space allocated to parked cars could be put to much better use.” But not housing — so far.

New York Times on CA housing crisis

By the Editorial Board, The New York Times, April 28, 2019. “Precisely because [SB50] rewrites the rules for so much California land, it is likely to facilitate development at a wide range of price points. … it could serve to reduce development pressures on communities outside the rezoned areas. … But it would be a mistake to preserve some affordable housing by preventing the construction of more affordable housing.”

SB 50/SB 4 compromise summary

By Liam Dillon, Los Angeles Times. April 24, 2019. SB 50 will be amended to do all of the below. SB 4 will be held in committee. The flowchart (created by Alfred Twu, Berkeley artist and activist) explains how different places may or may not be affected.

Street Air on Earth Day

By Zelda Zivny, Milo Wetherall, and Charlie Millenbah, April 22, 2019. Our research found that if cities chose to make simple design changes to pedestrian areas (or as we say, to the street-edge), the area’s outdoor eating experience could be notably safer as well as more enjoyable. Our recently completed film, “Airgregates, the Impact of Concrete Mixing Facilities on the Bay View Community,” has been selected as a finalist in the upcoming Clear the Air Film Fest sponsored by Breathe CA and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

Bay Area Homelessness Report

Bay Area Council Economic Institute, April 2019, 42 pp. At the end of each year, the Bay Area Council surveys its members to determine which public policy areas are of the greatest concern to the region’s largest employers. In the Council’s 2017 survey, ending chronic homelessness emerged as a top public policy priority.

“A highway runs through it”

By Nathanael Johnson in Grist, April 17, 2019. Oakland’s government has made removal of Interstate 980 a part of its plan for a growing downtown. The teardown could become part of a regional push to relieve traffic congestion by building a second BART tunnel beneath the bay.

CA cities and counties move to comply with State housing law

By Alicia Murillo, California HCD, April 12, 2019. As a result of Gov. Newsom’s efforts to address the state’s housing affordability crisis, the California HCD is seeing significant progress in compliance with state housing law. In February, Governor Newsom met with California mayors from noncomplying cities. Three cities have since complied and 14 others have submitted drafts or committed to compliance.

SF is world’s most expensive city in which to build, study says

By Ted Andersen, Digital Editor, San Francisco Business Times, April 12, 2019. The City by the Bay has dethroned the Big Apple as the world’s priciest place for new construction. This year, San Francisco removes New York from the top spot, having increased by 5 percent in the last year, according to a new report by consulting company Turner & Townsend.

Streetcar spurred development of an SF neighborhood 100 years ago

From an article by Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez, San Francisco Examiner, April 10, 2019. San Francisco’s Sunset District and Parkside neighborhoods are home to roughly 70,000 people. The seed of that development is the L Line, one little streetcar route established 100 years ago that soon connected downtown to the dunes.

My short course on Working with Difficult People

My short course on Working with Difficult People

By Steve Matarazzo

This is about arrogance in the public sector workplace, what might be behind it, and how it tends to play out.

If you are reading this, I am probably not writing about you being either an arrogant planner or a bureaucrat. I expect, however, that you will relate to this article, as the two types of “arrogant planner” I will describe are ubiquitous in the California public sector city-planning landscape. Keep in mind, I am only describing two types of high and mighty planner — and most of us are collegial, team players, and delightful in every way.

Over the past 40 years of my planning career, most of which has been within city and county planning departments, I have encountered two types of arrogant planner.

One appears to use arrogance as a defense mechanism, employing obnoxious behavior to keep fellow planners and other bureaucrats at bay. This planner tends to have a “hubristic arrogance,” or an overestimation of his or her competence. But on close examination, he turns out to be less than fully qualified for the position he holds and doesn’t want anyone to know about it. So he or she behaves abhorrently to repel people.

The second type of arrogant planner is imperious because he or she is better qualified and more competent than most of the other planners around. This planner has what I call a “prideful arrogance” based on his or her superior abilities compared to the other planners with whom she works or engages.

His holier than thou attitude bears results similar to the behavior of the first type: he tends to repel close, working relationships with other planners in the department.

Regarding the first type of arrogant planner, I have found little to gain from their knowledge, or lack thereof, so I have tended to give them the space they seek and deserve. But it is the second type of arrogant planner I have found most intriguing, and will engage with, no matter how strongly repulsive or condescending. Why? Because the imperious planners, like them or not, have had something to teach me. I have garnered significant vocational benefits from them over the years.

And then, of course, there are planners — arrogant or not — who may be difficult or repulsive for other reasons. Some may have had to attend several late night meetings in a row, or carry unreasonable workloads, or are going through adverse domestic situations. These planners may have barely slept for weeks while trying to solve major planning problems for the cities for which they work. It’s no surprise that they also tend to give you short shrift. So if you work with or around any of these planners — and there are quite a few these days — cut them some slack!

For the past three years, Steve Matarazzo has been planning director at the UC MBEST Center at the former Fort Ord, California. Before that, he was with Michael Baker International, and served as Sand City community development director (14 years) and city manager (six years) before retiring in March 2014. In earlier positions, Matarazzo worked for Santa Cruz County, Morgan Hill, and Woodside. He holds a master’s degree in urban and regional planning from San Jose State University and a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies from UC Santa Barbara. Over the years, Matarazzo has written a number of op-eds for Northern News, most recently in March 2017.

Pro bono planning assistance for California communities
Kingsburg community meeting — a well-attended City Council workshop with great participation. CPAT

Pro bono planning assistance for California communities

By Robert Paternoster, FAICP

Do you know of a municipality or community group that desperately needs planning assistance to address a pressing problem but doesn’t have the resources to hire a planner or planning consultant? Or perhaps you know of a new or struggling planning function that could benefit from peer review and support?

APA California can come to the rescue with its Community Planning Assistance Team (CPAT) program. Modeled after an APA National program of the same name, Cal Chapter’s CPAT provides pro bono (i.e., free) planning assistance to communities in need.

CPAT pairs teams of expert planning professionals from throughout the State with local resident, business, and government stakeholders to address a specific planning issue. The team members engage the community representatives in a short but intensive planning process which might result in a vision for the community’s future, a strategy for achieving specific planning goals, a site plan for a developing area, an economic development strategy, or a collaborative planning process for resolving ongoing local planning problems. Recent projects have included an economic development plan for Hughson, CA (southeast of Modesto); a set of action priorities for a new downtown development coordinator in Oxnard; and a revitalization strategy for Downtown Kingsburg, CA (southeast of Fresno).

A CPAT team recently assisted Kingsburg, a city of 12,000 in Fresno County. L-R, Stan Hoffman; Alexander Henderson, City Manager; Cynthia de la Torre; Michael Dozier; Robert Paternoster, CPAT Team Leader; Michelle Roman, Mayor; Tom Ford; Emily Morishita; and Jolene Polyack, Kingsburg’s Economic Development Advisor.

Here’s how to bring this free and helpful service to a town or community group that needs such assistance: Tell a local leader who might champion the project about CPAT, and put him or her in touch with the program administrator, Bob Paternoster (562) 400-3825 or robertpaternoster@yahoo.com. The program description — along with links to complete the Community Planning Assistance Team Volunteer Form and to complete and file a Community Request for Assistance Form — can be found here.

You may want to help the community fill out and submit the Request for Assistance. The only cost to the community would be the transportation and room and board costs for the team, usually no more than a few thousand dollars.

This is a great opportunity for communities throughout California. Please spread the word!

Robert Paternoster, FAICP, is an independent planning professional in the Los Angeles area. He served as Director of Planning and Building in Long Beach for 22 years and as Director of Community Development in Sunnyvale for six years. Bob holds a master of city planning from Harvard University and a BS in civil engineering from Lehigh University.

Meet a local planner — Kristi Bascom

Meet a local planner — Kristi Bascom

By Catarina Kidd, AICP

Kristi Bascom is Project Manager at Habitat for Humanity, East Bay/Silicon Valley, a position she took this January.

How did you become interested in planning?

As an undergraduate, I took classes in environmental studies that gave me my first exposure to land use planning. After graduating, I did advocacy for the Sierra Club. The intersection of protecting the environment and creating communities inspired me to return to school at SJSU to get a master’s degree in city planning.

Where did you work after graduation?

I worked for several Bay Area cities, primarily in current planning. I was principal planner at the City of Dublin. I also worked as a planning consultant and most recently as principal with M-group. Over the years, this work inspired me to think, how can we optimize good development? I dabbled in policy planning, but my interest is tangible results, creating neighborhoods and places for people. I was always interested in affordable housing, specifically in the gap between those who can already afford and those who can’t.

How were you able to change from traditional city planning to non-profit?

I asked industry professionals for some advice. What was the likelihood of a career planner pivoting to affordable housing, its own set of technical skills and background? I had no finance or construction background, was at mid-career, and felt in was a late shift.

Then there are the salary differences between most organizations and nonprofits. Is the move feasible or smart? For me, doing something directly meaningful carried more weight. I relied on the advice of several key advisors who made the pivot sound possible.

Any doubts now, after four months?

The idea of switching gears was both exciting and terrifying. Right now, the job market for planners is great. I was comfortable knowing that I could likely move back to planning if needed. I may not have been so bold in a tighter job market.

Can you comment on the idea of managing when you don’t love it?

Most planners will come to a point where they need to decide whether to go into managing people and processes. You have to determine your strength and passion. If your interest isn’t in managing, you won’t be successful. Are you effective at motivating others and good at overseeing people? Managing for any other reason is not going to lead to success. I really enjoy being a mentor and offering guidance, but I don’t think that it necessarily translates to being a good supervisor.

What are your core interests at Habitat for Humanity?

I admire Habitat’s ownership approach to housing. There are a lot of affordable housing developers on the rental side, but building affordable ownership housing is a niche. I appreciate Habitat’s methods, incorporating volunteers and sweat equity. I work with people who are passionate and good at what they do, with whole families building not just their home, but also their future neighborhood. Essentially, I am the architect’s client, involved with multiple facets of the project. It’s a learning process that keeps me optimistic.

The current discussion over local control has some saying that the housing crisis is isolated to specific counties in the Bay Area. Your thoughts?

Is there a housing crisis or an affordability crisis? Some cities and developers are building plenty of market-rate housing. The sales prices target upper tier incomes. But are there units priced for Bay Area workers? No. Hardly anyone wants a project of a scale, architecture, and unit count that doesn’t match their community’s “identity.” I think all can see that it is more desirable to have local community input. Still, there is that reality of how much people must pay and can pay. Typical middle-income workers have to find housing and residents need to find jobs. What kind of housing at what cost would serve people, such as those on the earlier side of their career or those in administrative, service, retail, and restaurant occupations — jobs that support the larger community. It isn’t healthy for people to live too far from work or too many people to a unit, and it is not sustainable for the people or their communities. The issue is a concern throughout the Bay Area, not just in certain counties.

Finding an affordable place to live is one thing, but getting ready to be a homeowner is another. Habitat has an entire department involved with family selection. We work with people to get them on a list for a Habitat home. We help them with credit counseling, developing a savings plan, and preparing to be a homeowner. Ownership speaks to me: people will put down roots and invest in their neighborhood for the long haul. From counterparts in other organizations, we hear that the below market rate housing wait lists are extremely long: 5,000 people waiting for 150 units. That is the real state of housing in California.

What advice do you have for new planners?

I have been an APA mentor for three years. I am so impressed with our new young planners. Land use is very broad and complex. Unless you, as a young planner, know specifically your niche, find an organization where you will be exposed to a lot of different things. Don’t say you don’t like something until you have tried it and worked at it. Keep an open mind. Say yes to new projects and topics.

What advice do you have for mid-career planners?

You bring your experience from elsewhere to your current place. As a consultant, I valued working for a number of cities. I enjoyed going to and learning about different locales. I’m not telling people to jump around, but you definitely will benefit from working for different organizations and in different settings — and you’ll be more likely to come away well-rounded and able to appreciate different perspectives.

There is a time to move on or try something new. Enthusiasm and a quest for knowledge are very important.

Interviewer Catarina Kidd, AICP, is Northern News’ associate editor. All interviews are edited.